Jacopo Gospel Quaggia was born on 3 July 1982 in Milan.

jacopo.quaggia@gmail.com

56. Here my thought is: If someone could see the expectation itself-he would have to see what is being expected. (But in such a way that it doesn’t further require a method of comparison, in order to pass from what he sees to the fact that is expected.)
But that’s how it is: if you see the expression of expectation you see “what is expected”.

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57. The idea that it takes finding to show what we were looking for, and fulfilment of a wish to show what he wanted, means one is judging the process like the symptoms of expectation or search in someone else. I see him uneasily pacing up and down his room; then someone comes in at the door and he relaxes and gives signs of satisfaction. And I say “Obviously he was expecting this person”.

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58. We say that the expression of expectation describes the expected fact and think of this as of an object or complex which makes its appearance as fulfilment of the expectation. -But it is not the expected thing that is the fulfilment, but rather: its coming about.
The Mistake is deeply rooted in our language: we say “I expect him” and “I expect his arrival”, and “I expect he is coming”.

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59. It is difficult for us to shake off this comparison: a man makes his appearance -an event makes its appearance. As if an event even now stood in readiness before the door of reality [WIRKLICHKEIT] and were then to make its appearance in reality -like coming into a room.

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60. Reality is not a property still missing in what is expected and which accedes to it when one’s expectation comes about. -Nor is reality like the daylight that things need to acquire color, when they are already there, as it were colorless, in the dark.

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63. Some will perhaps want to say “An expectation is a thought”. And we need to remember that the process of thinking may be very various.

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64. I whistle and someone asks me why I am so cheerful. I reply “I’m hoping N. will come today”. -But while I whistled I wasn’t thinking of him. All the same, it would be wrong to say: I stopped hoping when I began to whistle.

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66. Psychological -trivial- discussions about expectation, association etc always pass over what is really noteworthy and it is noticeable that they talk around, without touching, the punctum saliens.

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65. If I say “I am expecting…”, -am I remarking that the situation, my actions, thoughts etc are those expectancy of this event; or are the words: ”I am expecting…” part of the process of expecting?
In certain circumstances these words will mean (will be replaceable by) “I believe such-and-such will occur”. Sometimes also: “Be prepared for this to happen…”

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An expectation is embedded in a situation from which it takes its rise. The expectation of an explosion for example, may arise from a situation in which an explosion is to be expected. The man who expects it had heard two people whispering: “Tomorrow at ten o’clock the fuse will be lit”. Then he thinks: perhaps someone means to blow up a house here. Towards ten o’clock he becomes uneasy, jumps at every sound, and at last answers the question why is so tense: “I’m expecting…”. This answer will e.g. make his behaviour intelligible. It will enable us to fill out the picture of his thoughts and feelings.

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68. Fulfilment of expectation doesn’t consist in this: a third thing happens which can be described otherwise than as “the fulfilment of this expectation”, i.e. as a feeling of satisfaction or joy or whatever it may be. The expectation that something will be the case is the same as the expectation of the fulfilment of that expectation.
[Marginal note: Expectation of what is not]

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Text from Ludwig Wittgenstein, Zettel,1967, Basil Blackwell, Oxford
Edited By G.E.M. Anscombe and G.H. von Wright
Translated by G.E.M. Anscombe